Banish Acid Reflux with a Gerd Diet

Our last blog covered the neurological causes of acid reflux, or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), and gave three natural remedies for alleviating the painful symptoms of GERD. However, if acid reflux is not being caused by neurological reasons then it is most likely dietary choices that are leading to increased acid in the stomach.

Creating too much acid in the stomach.gerd diet, healthy gut bacteria

There are several food ingredients able to cause an imbalance in the acidity level within the stomach. Not only that, these foods are able to cause a laundry list of ailments within the body, including acne, fatigue, weakened hair, nails and bones, depression and anxiety, and even auto-immune diseases. We essentially become what we put into our bodies. If we overload our bodies with toxins and nutrient deficient foods our bodies begin to break down at a rapid rate and become more susceptible to disease. Along the way our bodies give telltale signs like indigestion, heartburn, and the previously mentioned laundry list that something is not right on the inside.

Why is my stomach creating more acid?

This is THE question to answer when figuring out a treatment for acid reflux symptoms. The answer is really quite simple. There is an overgrowth of bacteria within the intestinal tract. This bacteria didn’t just magically appear on its own, it grew and was fed by a poor diet. When there is an abundance of bacteria in the gut the body creates more acid in order to kill off the bacteria. The increased acid is the telltale sign of the overgrowth of bacteria. AHA! This makes perfect sense, right?

Diminishing acid in the gut with antacids and medication will make you more comfortable momentarily, however, it will allow an environment for more bacteria to reproduce leading to even more increased acid and uncomfortable symptoms. It’s a nasty cycle that will lead you into poor health!

Next question, what is creating the bacteria in my gut?

Being aware of the fact that there is good bacteria and bad bacteria living in the gut is the first step in learning about gut health.gerd diet, healthy gut bacteria

Here’s a list of ways to cultivate good gut bacteria by maintaining an alkaline environment:

  1. Eat lots of colorful fruits and vegetables.
  2. Eat fermented foods.
  3. Take a probiotic supplement.
  4. Stay away from dairy, especially yogurt.
  5. Avoid sugar at all costs, it’s the food that FEEDS bacteria.
  6. Pass on high glycemic foods (breads and pastas), they turn to sugar during digestion.
  7. Kick stress and enhance digestion with exercise, go for a walk.
  8. Say no to antibiotics because they kill off all bacteria in the body and not just sickness.

Dr. David Williams explains how friendly bacteria keeps you healthy:

Healthy gut bacteria produce byproducts that help keep the intestinal lining strong, and without enough good bacteria to manufacture these substances, the intestinal tract becomes highly susceptible to damage. Inflammation then leads to ulceration, which destroys areas of the mucosal lining of the intestinal wall. These “breaks” allow disease-causing bacteria, toxins, and undigested food particles to pass directly into the bloodstream, where they disrupt the the body’s normal function in many ways.

Chiropractic as the safest long term treatment for acid reflux (GERD).

If you’re already doing all these things and are leading a healthy lifestyle but still suffering from acid reflux disease it is likely the condition is stemming from a neurological cause. If you have experienced any kind of trauma, big or small, in your lifetime then its likely your spine was damaged and vertebrae are now irritating nerves controling digestion. When your body and brain are unable to communicate via the nervous system you will experience symptoms as a signal that something is not right in the body. Symptoms can arise immediately as seen with concussion, or can develop over time.

Read our recent blog on how neurological issues cause acid reflux and GERD.

 


 

Additional Sources:

  1. Dr.DavidWilliams.com
  2. PCRM.org
  3. SOTT.net